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The Messi Exit: A Legal & Financial Perspective

Behind the passions of the fans, tackled goals, swanky parties and brand endorsements, there is a lot that goes into structuring a football team/club, registration as well as the transfer of a player while maintaining sustainable finances. 

In response to multiple financial irregularities in clubs such as Deportivo La Coruña, Racing Santander, Valencia, Real Zaragoza, Real Mallorca, Albacete, Real Betis etc., the economic control framework was introduced in 2013 to keep clubs financially afloat and maintain competitive sustainability.

At a later stage, FFP (Financial Fair Play) came into effect against errant clubs for breach of regulations. Spain’s economic control- La Liga controls the fire before it can damage (to an extent) by setting a limit to the amount a club can spend, thereby making it easier to stay within limits and preventing the creation of unsustainable debts. 

What were the legal reasons for Messi’ s exit from Barcelona?

 

Recently Argentinean professional footballer Lionel Andrés Messi, popularly known as Leo Messi, decided to part ways with the Spanish football club FC Barcelona and join the French football club Paris Saint-Germain. Messi had been with the Spanish club for the last 21 years and their association came to an end on 30th June 2021, when they decided to move on.

Messi had agreed to a new five-year contract with Barcelona, however on 8th August 2021, the legendary football player announced his exit from the Spanish club, by signing a two-year contract with the French club Paris Saint-Germain, with the option of further extension up to a year. FC Barcelona announced that despite the agreement between the club and Messi, they were not able to honour the new contract due to the Spanish football league’s (LaLiga’s) financial fair-play rules. 

 

What is LaLiga Financial Fair-play Rule? 

 

Under the LaLiga fair play rule, each club is provided with a cost limit for each season, which includes the wages of the players, the coaching staff, physios, reserve teams, etc. Clubs have the flexibility to decide how the wages are distributed, as long as the overall limit is not breached. Factors taken into consideration for setting the financial cap are inclusive of expected revenues, profits and losses from previous years, existing debt repayments, and sources of external financing among others. In this case, the Catalan club could not accommodate Messi’s contract within the financial limit for the upcoming year, even though Messi was allegedly willing to take a 50% pay cut. 

Considering the fact that Messi is Barcelona’s record scorer with 751 goals and 10 La Liga titles, Messi’s exit could mean a heavy blow for the world’s most valuable[1] European football club. 

A football clubs’ main revenue is generated from TV broadcasting rights, matchday sales, and commercial revenue which includes sponsorship contracts, merchandising sales, and digital content that the club creates. It is too early to say whether Messi’s departure will have an impact on how Barcelona performs in the ongoing season. However, there is no question over how Messi has played an important role in bringing laurels to Barcelona over the past few years, which has garnered a significant fan following, not just for the footballer, but also for the club. Thus, his exit may likely cause a dip in the viewership and fan following which will directly affect the Club’s revenue.

Typically for a footballer, his contract with any club would include basic salary, signing-on fees, royalty fees, and objectives based on games. Apart from these, some of the other key element included in a contract is his image rights, merchandising right and licensing deals, which form a major portion of any footballer’s gross income. 

 

What are Image Rights? 

Image rights are the expression of a personality in the public domain. For an athlete, it will include their name, photo, and likeness, signature, personal brand, slogans, or logos, etc. Generally, football clubs try to extract a greater percentage from the image rights of a player, in a club capacity as compared to their personal capacity. Club capacity is usually when the image rights of the player are used in connection with or combined with his name, colours, crest, strip, logos identifying him as a player for his club. Personal capacity is usually when the player is appearing in and conducting activities outside his role as a player at the club. 

Any player leaving the club would have an impact on the commercial revenue generated by the club in the form of sponsorship contracts, merchandising sales as well as digital content. This would be especially notable for a player like Messi, whose personal brand value boasts over 130 trademarks. Messi’s trademark portfolio consists of mostly a single class trademark in his home country of Argentina, with others filed or registered in China, Brazil, EU, Malaysia, UK, Spain, Canada, Chile, and the US. The most common goods and services represented in Messi’s trademark portfolio are class 25 (clothing and footwear), class 28 (games, toys, and sporting apparatus) and class 9 (computer software). Apart from the above classes, class 18 has been filed in multiple applications.

The trademark consists of either the word mark MESSI/LIONEL MESSI or his logo. This means that Barcelona will no longer be able to use the footballer’s name or logo for apparel and merchandise sales, which will directly impact its revenue as most clubs collect a portion of the sales revenue. Also, Messi’s exit means that the club will have no control over his image rights to attract corporate sponsorships. Further, Messi’s huge online presence, with over 276 million Instagram followers, which is more than double of Barcelona’s official account (100 million), will have a direct impact on any advertising or publicity that the club may generate. 

A player of Messi’s stature, brand, and persona is significant to any club. How the present scenario is played with the new club and how much impact Messi’s presence will bring to Paris Saint-Germain is yet to be seen. 

A football clubs’ main revenue is generated from TV broadcasting rights, matchday sales and commercial revenue which includes sponsorship contracts, merchandising sales and digital content that the club creates. It is too early to say whether Messi’s departure will have an impact on how Barcelona performs in the ongoing season.

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Protection of Family Assets in the Trying Times of COVID

When death hits closer to home, it is accompanied by an ancillary ramification apart from emotional and psychological distress – finances. Many families have had to confront this reality as the pandemic left a trail of deaths across the country. Apart from grappling with insurmountable pain, one is often saddled with time-bound financial formalities, asset management and planning.Family businesses have been gravely impacted due to the COVID situation and it has acted for a wake-up call for planning the protection of valuable assets. 

Financial planning is a step-by-step process that is designed to meet fiscal requirements at every milestone of one’s life. For instance, creating a fund for children’s education, investing in retirement planning etc. The aim is to build a corpus of sufficient funds over a period of 15-30 years of continued investment and planning, which enables one to sustain financial responsibilities in these events. Another aspect of asset planning is setting up a contingency fund, which is most relevant and crucial in the present scenario of sudden deaths and unanticipated health emergencies. 

Lack of a structured plan can lead the family into chaos which may further result in litigation, a scenario not alien to many unsuspecting families today. This article aims to assist you through this dilemma by constituting an exhaustive list of tasks and legal measures one can undertake to ease the workload and formalities in such circumstances.

Documents and Immediate Actions for Families

The first step should be the collection of all documents, essential for dealing with various government and financial institutions. If the deceased had conducted a majority of transactions online, it is essential to secure access to their online accounts, with account numbers and login passwords.

The second step is securing the death certificate. In India, all deaths have to be mandatorily registered within 21 days of demise. If the same is done within 21-30 days, a penalty of INR 25 is charged. The certificate has to be certified by the medical officer. After 30 days and up to a year, the joint director of statistics is authorized to issue the certificate. The application has to be filed with a fine of INR 50 and an affidavit. After a year, the certificate is only issued by an order of a first-class magistrate, an application form which has to be accompanied by a “cause of death” certificate, cremation certificate, and an affidavit. The death certificate is vital for every financial task that has to be conducted in pursuance of the asset and financial management of the deceased.

Once all the above-mentioned documents and details are organized and collected, one can move forwards with the following tasks;

  1. Try to find out if the deceased person made a Will while they were living. A Will exponentially eases the process of transfer of assets, since most of the confusion is put to rest.
  1. Next, the efforts must be directed towards assessing the deceased’s liabilities and loans (secured/unsecured). This includes home, vehicles, personal loans or credit card dues. In such cases, the first step should be informing the creditor about the demise. In case the borrower had a co-signor/joint debtor the latter shall repay the loans. In the case of a single borrower; if a Will is in place, the executor shall be responsible for settling the debts, in the absence of a Will, an administrator (typically the   is appointed by the court to repay the liabilities.
  1. The heirs or children of the deceased (if adults) can undertake a mature discussion about the distribution of assets. The family must try to unite to avoid litigation. If possible, appoint a trustworthy person to carry out the necessary legal obligations.
  1. Take stock of all the assets in the name of the deceased and make a list with the valuation. Even if the deceased made a Will but left out a property that they later acquired, the property will be distributed according to intestate laws. i.e., the personal law of the individual.
  1. When it comes to insurance, deposits in banks, and shares of the deceased, in most cases, nominees are appointed. Notify the financial institutions of the death of the person and make inquires for the procedure to be followed by the nominee.
  1. In the event of the demise of both parents, where are minor children involved, it is essential that a guardian be appointed for them. If not appointed by a Will, in the case of Hindus, a guardian may be appointed by the court.
  1. Hire a local attorney to advise you. Keep in mind that laws in India relating to succession are not uniform. Moreover, legal procedures to get the appropriate documentation differ from state to state. Hence, it is recommended to hire someone who is well-versed with the local laws of the state in which the deceased resided or where they owned property.

Future Planning for Protection of Assets of a Family Business

People usually start thinking about protecting their assets only once they reach their late 40’s and 50’s. The ongoing pandemic has been a much-needed reality check which has triggered the families and individuals to structure their assets and finances for unforeseeable circumstances, even young adults.

What can you do to protect your estate in your life so that your assets are distributed according to your wishes?

 

  1. Will: Having a Will in place would make your life as well as the life of your loved ones quite simple. There is no fixed format for a Will under the law. The only requirements for a valid Will according to the Indian Succession Act, 1925 are; it should be made by a sound adult, signed by them, and attested by two witnesses. It is recommended that an Executor be appointed in the Will to reduce hassles. It is not compulsory to register a Will. Probate is also required only if the Will is made in Bengal, Bihar, Orissa, and Assam and within the local limits of the ordinary original civil jurisdiction of the High Courts of Madras and Bombay or where the property of the deceased is situated in these areas.
  1. Trusts: A trust may be created during the lifetime of a person who is called the author/s It may be created with a written legal document through which the assets of the settlor are placed into a trust and trustees are appointed therein who manage these assets for the benefit of the settlor and the beneficiaries named in the Trust Deed. The settlor can also be one of the trustees or the managing trustee of the trust during their lifetime. This gives them control over their assets while they are still living. The biggest advantage of Trust is that it operates both during and after a person’s life.
  • A provision can also be made in the Trust Deed for the appointment of a guardian for minor children in case both the parents die. The Trust Deed may provide instructions regarding the administration of the property to take care of one’s children.
  • A written Trust Deed is signed by the Settlor, requires a minimum of two trustees and two witnesses. The trust may or not be registered; registration is required only if an immovable property is transferred to the trust.
  • When a settlor dies, the trustee pays the debts, files the tax returns, and distributes the assets of a deceased. Trusts are an effective estate planning tool if one wants to avoid the costs and hassles involved in obtaining probate. It is a quick and quiet procedure, preserving one’s privacy and done without any court interference.
  1. Guardianship: Where minor children are involved, it is very important to make provisions either in a Will or by Trust, for appointing a guardian for minor children in the event of a death. If one parent dies, then the other living parent becomes the guardian. If both parents die, then it is needed to mention who will be accorded guardianship. Failure to do so will involve the intervention of courts and various applicable laws given India’s pluralistic society. The need for an appropriate guardian is to provide for personal needs but to also ensure that any future assets to be inherited are protected during the period of minority.

How does Ownership of Assets Transfer after the Death of a Person?

 

There are two scenarios that are to be considered while determining the ownership of the assets after the death of a person:

  1. In case a person dies leaving a Will; or
  2. In case a person dies without leaving a Will

Where there is a Will

Leaving behind a validly executed Will is the most uncomplicated mode through which a property can pass to the next owner. If an Executor is appointed in the Will, they should apply for the probate of the Will where Probate is mandatory. Once a Probate is obtained, the Executor is responsible for paying off all the debts of the deceased, managing the expenses for all the properties, and distributing the assets to all the beneficiaries according to the Will of the Testator.

Where there is No Will

The ownership of the property will be determined by intestate succession i.e succession according to the personal law applicable to the deceased individual. The heirs will be determined in accordance with the religion of the intestate for example Hindus, Buddhists, Sikhs and Jains will be governed by the Hindu Succession Act, 1956, Muslims will be governed by the Mohammedan Law and all others will be determined by the Indian Succession Act, 1925.

What are the legal options available to the heirs of the deceased?

 
  • Letters of AdministrationSection 273 of the Indian Succession Act, 1925 provides for Letters of Administration which are granted by the court to the individual who volunteers to be the administrator with the consent of the legal heirs for the lawful distribution of assets of the deceased. The purpose of grant of Letters of Administration is only to enable the administrator so appointed by the court to collect/assimilate the properties of the deceased and to deal with the various authorities with whom the properties of the deceased may be vested or recorded and thereafter the same be transferred in the names of the successors in accordance with the law of succession applicable to the deceased. The administrator during the proceedings is required from time to time to file the accounts in the court with respect to the administration of the estate of the deceased.[1]
  • Succession Certificate: Succession certificate entitles the holder to inherit the moveable assets of the deceased and to make payment of a debt or transfer securities to the holder of certificate without having to ascertain the legal heir entitled to it. A Succession Certificate is not granted where Probate or Letters of Administration are mandatory to be obtained. The purpose of a succession certificate is limited in respect of debts and securities such as provident fund, insurance, deposits in banks, shares, or any other security of the central government or the state government to which the deceased was entitled.
  • Family Arrangement: Family arrangement resolves present or possible future disputes among family members ensuring equitable distribution of property among the family members.[2] In a Family arrangement, a member gives up all claims in respect of all the properties in dispute other than the ones falling to their share. The rights of all the others are recognised. Therefore, under a Family arrangement, members of a family may decide amongst themselves about the distribution of the property of the deceased. A Family arrangement would have to be appropriately stamped and registered. However, even oral arrangements are valid in the eyes of law.
  • Administration Suit: Order 20, Rule 13 of the Civil Procedure Code, 1908 deals with an administration suit that is filed by a person seeking administration of the estate of the deceased. It is resorted to when there is no amicable settlement of disputes amongst the family members of the deceased. Under the decree, distribution of the assets of the deceased amongst the heirs can be sought along with the administration. In an administration suit, the court takes upon itself the function of an executor or administrator and administers the estate of the deceased. The suit in its essence is one for an account and for application of the estate of the deceased for the satisfaction of the debts of all the creditors and for the benefit of all others who are entitled.
  • Partition: In the case of Hindus under the Hindu Succession Act, the co-parceners may claim for a partition of the property. Under the Mitakshara law, the partition of a joint estate consists of defining the shares of the coparceners in the joint property. Once the shares are defined there is a severance of the joint status. Therefore, all that is required for a partition to take place is a definite and unequivocal intention by a member of a joint family to separate himself from the family. An actual division of the property by metes and bounds is not necessary. It may be declared orally or by an agreement in writing or by instituting a suit for partition of the property in the court. The difference between family arrangement and partition is that any member of the family can enter a family arrangement, but partition can only take place between co-parceners.

 

Not only have the consequences of the pandemic made protection of assets a top priority for most individuals but it has also encouraged people to ensure the protection of their assets through a Will or a Trust. The primary reason for this change in approach can be owed to India’s pluralistic society which sets limitations on estate and succession rights and adopts the regime of forced heirship in some cases of intestate succession. Additionally, the time-consuming and tedious process for completing the transfer of assets when the courts get involved has also facilitated this shift in individual priorities.

References

[1] Ramesh Chand Sharma V/s State & Ors  (High Court of Delhi, Test. Cas. 66/2011, Date of Decision: 20.01.2015, Coram: Indermeet Kaur, J.)

[2] Kale & Others vs Deputy Director of Consolidation 1976 AIR 807

Image Credits: Photo by Matthias Zomer from Pexels

Not only have the consequences of the pandemic made protection of assets a top priority for most individuals but it has also encouraged people to ensure the protection of their assets through a Will or a Trust. The primary reason for this change in approach can be owed to India’s pluralistic society which sets limitations on estate and succession rights and adopts the regime of forced heirship in some cases of intestate succession.

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Recent Relaxations On Debenture Issuance Related Compliances Under The Companies Act, 2013

The provisions of the Companies Act, 2013 (the “Act”) relating to the issuance of debentures, stipulate various requirements which the issuing company has to comply with, which includes maintaining a Debenture Redemption Reserve (DRR) account and in case of a secured debenture, filing of charge-related documents.

The outbreak of COVID-19 and the related regulatory lockdowns have affected business inflows and administrative functioning of many organizations. On one hand, some of the companies are facing financial difficulties in meeting their repayment obligations under the debentures issued, while on the other hand, these companies are unable to meet the statutory requirements stipulated under the Act. Considering the request of various stakeholders, the Ministry of Corporate Affairs, India (“the MCA”) has brought out several relaxations relating to the compliance requirements for debenture issuance under the Act.

 

Debenture Redemption Reserve:

In order to protect the interest of the debenture holders, as per section 71 (4) of the Act, the companies, which have issued debentures, are mandatorily required to create a DRR account and transfer the stipulated sum of money to such account, every year, out of the profits of the company. The amount credited to such account shall be out of the profits of the company available for payment of dividend and the amount credited to such account shall not be utilized by the company except for the redemption of debentures.

Pursuant to the Companies (Share Capital and Debentures) Amendment Rules[1], 2019 dated 16th August 2019 (“the Amendment Rules”), the requirements of maintaining DRR account was further relaxed and only certain class of companies are required to comply with the provision to create a DRR account and to transfer money to the said account. In furtherance to the said Amendment Rules, the requirement of the DRR was modified as follows:

  • The requirement of DRR was removed for both privately placed debentures and public issue of debentures both by Non-Banking Finance Companies (NBFCs) (registered with Reserve Bank of India under section 45- IA of the RBI Act, 1934) and Housing Finance Companies (HFCs) (registered with National Housing Bank);
  • The requirement for other listed companies (other than NBFCs and HFCs) to create DRR, both in case of private issuance and public issuance of debentures, has been done away with; and
  • The requirement for DRR was reduced from 25% to 10% of the value of the outstanding Debentures in case of unlisted companies (other than NBFC and HFCs).

Pursuant to the above changes, only unlisted Companies (other than unlisted NBFCs and HFCs) are required to comply with the DRR requirement.

It may be noted that, in addition to the requirement of maintaining the DRR account, every listed company (including NBFCs and HFCs) issuing debentures under public issue and private placement basis and other unlisted companies (excluding NBFCs and HFCs) issuing debentures under private placement basis was required to invest in specified Government securities or deposit with a scheduled bank (as the case may be) a sum of not less than 15%, of the amount of its debentures maturing during the year, ending on the 31st day of March of the next year. Further, the amount so invested shall remain invested or deposited and shall not fall below fifteen percent of the amount of the debentures maturing during the year ending on the 31st day of March of that year. Though there were relaxations provided with respect to maintaining the DRR being brought into effect through the said Amendment Rules, however, the requirement of making such investment was retained to protect the investor sentiment. 

However, in consonance with the above relaxations, the MCA vide its notification dated 5th June 2020 (“Notification of 2020”) has now amended the clause (v) of the sub-rule (7) of Rule 18 of the Companies (Share Capital and Debentures) Rules, 2014. As per the Notification of 2020, the requirement of maintaining a deposit or investment to a tune of 15% of the total amount of debentures (maturing as of 31st March of the next year) has been relaxed for listed NBFCs, HFCs and other listed companies undertaking debenture issuance on private placement basis.

 

Compliances towards charge filings:

As per the existing provision of the Act, the company creating a charge over its assets or properties is required to file Form CHG-1[2] and CHG-9[3] with the MCA within 30 days from the date of creation or modification of charges (as the case may be). With the recent changes[4] in the provisions relating to charge filing, a company which fails to file the e-form within the said timeline has the ability to make an application to the Registrar for filing by making payment of additional fees[5] and the additional time period is as follows:

  • in case of charges created before the commencement of the Companies (Amendment) Ordinance, 2019 (“Ordinance”) viz. 2nd November 2018, within a period of 300 days of such creation; or six months from 2nd November 2018 by making payment of additional fees, which is an exposure of a maximum of 12 times of the normal fees; and
  • in case of charges created on or after the commencement of the Ordinance, within a period of a maximum 120 days of such creation (application has to be preferred after the initial 60 days), on payment of ad-valorem fees as may be prescribed subject to the maximum of Rs. 5,00,000/- (Rupees Five Lakhs)[6].

However, considering the request from the various stakeholders towards relaxation in the filing of these charges forms within the stipulated time frame as given under section 71, 77, 78 and Rule 3(1) of the Companies (Registration of Charges) Rules, 2014, the Government vide circular no. 23/2020 dated 17th June, 2020 (“Scheme for relaxation of time for filing forms related to creation or modification of charges under the Companies Act, 2013”, referred to as “the Charge Scheme” hereinafter), has further relaxed timeline for filing of forms related to the creation and modification of charges under the Act.

 

Provisions of the Scheme:

With the introduction of the Charge Scheme, the MCA has given relaxation in the filing of the Forms towards charge creation and modification and for this, the applicability of the scheme is considered on two-levels, as provided below:

  1. Where the date of creation and modification of charge is of a date prior to 1st March 2020, but the timeline for filing such form had not expired under section 77 of the Act as on 1st March 2020:

In such cases, it has been clarified that the period beginning from 1stMarch 2020 and ending on 30th September 2020 (“exempted period”) shall not be reckoned for the purpose of counting the number of days under section 77 and 78 of the Act. In case, the form is not filed within such period, the first day after 29thFebruary 2020 shall be reckoned as 1st October 2020 for the purpose of counting the number of days within which the form is required to be filed under the relevant provisions of the Act.

 

Put in other words, the exempted period will not be considered for computing the maximum period of 120 days for filing of CHG-9 for creation and modification of charges. Hence, the forms for which the timeline for filing has not expired as on 1st March 2020, can be filed without paying any additional fees towards the exempted period. As such, the companies can benefit from the Scheme by paying only the fees as applicable on 29.02.2020, only if the company manages to file their pending forms within the relaxation period i.e. from 01.03.2020 to 30.09.2020. Otherwise, the benefit to the company is that it will be entitled to make the filing of the form, however, by paying the additional fees for the days beginning from 01.10.2020 till the date of filing of such form. It is to be noted that the filing has to be done still within the maximum permissible time limit of 120 days by paying additional fees or ad valorem fees as the case may be.

 

 

  1. Where the date of creation or modification of charge falls on any date between 1st March 2020 to 30th September 2020 (both days inclusive):

In case the due date of filing the form for creation or modification of charges falls between the relaxation period and the Company fails to file the form within 30.09.2020, the first day after the date of creation or modification of charge shall be reckoned as 01.10.2020 for the purpose of counting the number of days within which the form is required to be filed under section 77 or section 78 of the Act.

 

It is pertinent to note that, if the form is filed before 30.09.2020, normal fees shall be chargeable under the Fees Rules. However, if the form is filed thereafter, the first day after the date of creation or modification of charges shall be reckoned as 01.10.2020 and the company will have to complete the filing within the maximum number of additional days permitted by paying the additional fees or ad valorem fees as the case may be.

 

Conclusion:

The exemptions provided last year towards the requirement of maintaining DRR was a big step to ease the compliance requirements for companies especially for those companies which are facing a financial crisis, however, it had affected the sentiments of investors in the debt market as the protection provided to the investor was being diluted. Now, with further relaxation in the requirement of maintaining the 15% deposit for listed companies undertaking debenture issuance on a private placement basis, the regulator needs to consider providing an adequate safety net to encourage investor protection.

The introduction of the Charge Scheme is yet another move by the authority to help ease India Inc. which could be welcomed by the investors as well. But again, the Charge Scheme also aims favours India Inc. whereby companies are provided extension of the time period to complete the filing of charge creation or modification.

Keeping aside the monetary exposure, wherein the maximum exposure towards the additional fees is the ad-valorem value (that too to an extent of Rs.5,00,000/-), the only benefit in terms of an investor especially in case of debenture issuances, is that the Charge Scheme enables the company to complete the pending filings. Moreover, the Act provides that a liquidator appointed under the Insolvency and Bankruptcy Code, 2016 has to take into account the charge created by a company and such charge has to be registered. This allows the investor to ensure that companies can rectify the filings and adequately reflect the charge with the Registrar.

However, it must be noted that the benefit will not be applicable if the timeline for filing of the form has expired, even after excluding the exempted period. Further, the contractual right of the investor to enforce the repayment of the obligation (which is secured by the charge) would still remain. While these recent changes are a small breather to India Inc., regulators should not forget to protect the interest of investors, especially in these testing times.

 

 

References

[1]  Rule 18 of the Companies (Share Capital and Debentures) Rules, 2014

[2] Refer section 71, 77, 78 and 79 of the Companies Act, 2013 along with Rule 3(1) of the Companies (Registration of Charges) Rules, 2014.

[3] Refer section 77, 78 and 79 of the Companies Act, 2013 along with Rule 3 of the Companies (Registration of Charges) Rules, 2014.

[4] Companies (Amendment) Ordinance,2019

[5] Refer the Companies (Registration of Offices and Fees) Rules, 2014 (“Fees Rules”)

[6] For ease of reference, we have considered fees structure applicable for non-small companies.

 

 

Image Credits: Photo by Austin Distel on Unsplash

The exemptions provided last year towards the requirement of maintaining DRR was a big step to ease the compliance requirements for companies especially for those companies which are facing a financial crisis, however, it had affected the sentiments of investors in the debt market as the protection provided to the investor was being diluted. Now, with further relaxation in the requirement of maintaining the 15% deposit for listed companies undertaking debenture issuance on a private placement basis, the regulator needs to consider providing an adequate safety net to encourage investor protection.

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A Brief Analysis of the Patents (Amendment) Rules, 2019

The Government of India, Ministry of Commerce and Industry (Department for Promotion of Industry and Internal Trade) vide its notification dated September 17, 2019, has published the Patents (Amendment) Rules, 2019[i] (hereinafter the “Rules”) amending the Patents Rules, 2003 (hereinafter the “Principal Rules”). The amendment came into force from the date of notification.

 

The Government of India, Ministry of Commerce and Industry (Department for Promotion of Industry and Internal Trade) vide its notification dated September 17, 2019, has published the Patents (Amendment) Rules, 2019[i] (hereinafter the “Rules”) amending the Patents Rules, 2003 (hereinafter the “Principal Rules”). The amendment came into force from the date of notification.

 

The highlights of the amendments are as follows:

 

  1. Rule 6: Leaving and serving documents

 

The amended Rules substitute Rule 6 (1-A) with the following:

“Notwithstanding anything contained in sub-rule (1), a patent agent shall file, leave, make or give all documents only by electronic transmission duly authenticated:

Provided that any document, if asked to be submitted in original, shall be submitted within a period of fifteen days, failing which such documents shall be deemed not to have been filed.”

 

Analysis: This amendment is brought to reduce the burden of submission of scanned copies of original documents subsequent to the filing of the same online. The amendment clarifies that the original copies are required to be submitted only when requested by the Indian Patent Office, within 15 days from the date of request.

 

  1. Rule 7: Fees

 

The amended Rules substitute the second proviso of Rule 7(1) with the following:

“Provided further that in the case of a small entity, or startup, every document, for which a fee has been specified, shall be accompanied by Form-28.”

 

Analysis: Again, this amendment is merely clarificatory in nature with respect to the filing of Form 28 along with documents that specify fee. In the principal rule, the provision existed only for small entities and the word ‘startup’ was not expressly mentioned. However, it was already in practice i.e. the patent office required Form 28 to be submitted with documents requiring fee even for startups.

 

  1. Rule 24-C: Expedited examination of applications

 

The amended Rules substitute Rule 24C(1)(b) with the following:  

“(b) that the applicant is a startup; or

(c) that the applicant is a small entity; or

(d) that if the applicant is a natural person or in the case of joint applicants, all the applicants are natural persons, then the applicant or at least one of the applicants is a female; or

(e) that the applicant is a department of the Government; or

(f) that the applicant is an institution established by a Central, Provincial or State Act, which is owned or controlled by the Government; or

(g) that the applicant is a Government company as defined in clause (45) of section 2 of the Companies Act, 2013 (18 of 2013); or

(h) that the applicant is an institution wholly or substantially financed by the Government;

Explanation:- For the purpose of this clause, the term ‘substantially financed’ shall have the same meaning as in the Explanation to sub-section (1) of section 14 of the Comptroller and Auditor General’s (Duties, Powers and Conditions of Service) Act, 1971(56 of 1971); or

(i) that the application pertains to a sector which is notified by the Central Government on the basis of a request from the head of a department of the Central Government.:

 Provided that public comments are invited before any such notification; or

(j) that the applicant is eligible under an arrangement for processing a patent application pursuant to an agreement between Indian Patent Office and a foreign Patent Office.

Explanation: – The patentability of patent applications filed under clause (j) above will be in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Act.”

 

Analysis: The Principal Rules had provision for expedited examinations only in case of startups and international applications where India was a competent searching/examining authority, however, that has been amended to include additional categories of applicant such as small entity, natural person(s) having at least one female applicant, institution or department of Government or controlled by Government. Also, Government companies, institutions wholly or substantially financed by the Government, sectors notified by the Government and applicants eligible under an agreement with a foreign patent office can also file for expedited examination. This amendment will motivate other categories of applicants to have fast track examination of patent applications for early grant of patent.

 

Further, in order to accommodate the said categories, the corresponding Form 18A has been amended.

 

  1. First Schedule: Transmittal Fee & Certified copy fee towards filing an International Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) application

 

The amended Rules add:

  1. If the PCT application is filed online, the applicant is not required to pay any fee towards the Transmittal fee. Earlier applicants were required to pay fees ranging from 3200 to 16000. The fees for physical filing remain unchanged.
  2. If a request is filed for preparation of a certified copy of priority document and sharing the same via e-transmission through WIPO DAS, the applicant is not required to pay any fee for the same. Earlier applicants had to pay fees ranging from 1000 to 5000. The fees for physical filing remain unchanged.

 

The amendment in the Rules, especially the expansion of the expedited examination system, would augment the government’s patent prosecution highway (PPH) program that intends to harmonize the patent examination standards and encourage the filing of patent applications in India. In September 2018, after the Second JPO- DIPP Review Meeting in August 2018, the Japan Patent Office (JPO) and the Department of Industrial Policy and Promotion (DIPP) had agreed in principle, to start a bilateral PPH program on a pilot basis in certain identified fields of inventions in the first quarter of fiscal year 2019.[ii] The amendment seems to be a result of the agreement and the intention of improving the overall IP environment of the country. Additionally, the waiver of the transmittal and certified copy fees would also increase the filing of PCT applications and facilitate the ease of doing business in India.

The amendment in the Rules, especially the expansion of the expedited examination system, would augment the government’s patent prosecution highway (PPH) program that intends to harmonize the patent examination standards and encourage the filing of patent applications in India. In September 2018, after the Second JPO- DIPP Review Meeting in August 2018, the Japan Patent Office (JPO) and the Department of Industrial Policy and Promotion (DIPP) had agreed in principle, to start a bilateral PPH program on a pilot basis in certain identified fields of inventions in the first quarter of fiscal year 2019

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