10 Mar 2020

 “Orphan drugs” are pharmaceutical products used for the diagnosis, prevention or treatment of rare diseases. The definition of rare diseases varies from country to country. e.g. in the United States, a rare disease is defined as a condition that affects fewer than 200,000 people whereas in Europe it is less than one person per 2,000. Nevertheless, it is generally accepted that a disease having fewer than 100 patients per 100,000 population is a rare disease. It is assessed that internationally, around 6000 to 8000 rare diseases are in existence with new ones being discovered quite regularly. Moreover, it is estimated that there are approx. 4000-5000 rare diseases for which there are no treatments available. In India, the rare disease and disorder population is between 72 to 96 million and up to 450 rare diseases have been recognized[i]. Because rare diseases affect a very small population of individuals and the profit potential is poor, pharmaceutical companies often do not take much interest in developing molecules for the treatment of these diseases. The shelving of these molecules and ignorance of the small patient pool gave rise to the concept of ‘pharmaceutical orphans.’>>

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18 Feb 2020

India moved up one spot up in terms of trademark filings from its previous year’s ranking according to the World Intellectual Property Indicators published in October 2019[1]. The report also pointed out a large increase in trademark filing activity in India i.e. more than 20.9% with resident filing activity overwhelmingly contributing to the double-digit growth. Having remained below 100,000 until 2006, India’s trademark annual filings now exceed 320,000.>>

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04 Sep 2018

In a recent case of Disney Enterprises, Inc. and Ors. vs. Pankaj Aggarwal and Ors. [CS (Comm.) 449/2016, I.A. 2107/2014 and I.A. 2110/2014], the Delhi High Court dealt with the issue of character merchandising and upheld that the use of the character “Lightning McQueen” violated the copyrights of Disney (Plaintiff) and also the rights in the character.>>

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12 May 2017

It is a well-known fact that India as a country is rich in traditional knowledge (TK) which has been passed on across generations. Indian traditional knowledge is expressed in languages such as Sanskrit, Arabic, Persian, Urdu and Tamil; there is also a large body of unwritten knowledge that is passed on orally from one generation to another. Ancient traditional knowledge is vital to the identity of most local communities in India. TK also helps local communities thrive by way of culture, healthcare, trade and development, etc. TK is being commercially exploited in India and other countries by patenting. Patenting the already existing TK prejudices the interests of rightful owners and prevents others from using such TK.>>

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02 May 2017

When a patent application is filed in multiple jurisdictions, the applicant is obligated to disclose details of filing in other jurisdictions, to the Indian Patent Office. The details to be disclosed include application number, date of filing, jurisdictions/country(ies) in which the application has been filed, date of publication, date of grant, and status of the application(s). Objective of the section is to keep the controller/patent office apprised about the filing and processing of patent applications based on same or similar inventions in other jurisdictions.>>

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09 Mar 2017

In a constructive attempt to streamline, simplify and expedite the trademark registration processes, the Trade Mark Rules, 2017 have been notified and came into effect from March 6th 2017. In consonance with the National IPR Policy, 2016, the Rules also introduce specific provisions for Start-Ups and Small Enterprises to stimulate and promote innovation and creativity among such entities.>>

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01 Sep 2016

This morning, when I opened my inbox, one email in particular surprised me. The email contained our first ever “e-certificate” for a trademark application filed just about one year ago! In the past, such prompt action by Indian IP Offices was almost unheard of. But clearly, the technology-enabled procedural changes introduced over the past year or so have begun to bear fruit.>>

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17 May 2016

With the objective of stimulating India’s intellectual property rights (IPR) system to make it more dynamic, vibrant and responsive to the growing push being given to innovation and entrepreneurship, the Union Cabinet has approved the National IPR Policy on 12th May 2016. This was announced via a press release dated 13th May 2016.  >>

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