06 Aug 2018

Yet another attempt has been made by the legislative authorities to reduce the number of frivolous cases and expedite the disposal of cases on dishonour of cheques by amending the Negotiable Instruments Act, 1881 (“Act”) to provide interim relief to the genuine/bona-fide complaints. The amendment is an attempt to help trade and commerce in general by allowing lending institutions, including banks, to continue to extend financial support to the productive sectors of economy.>>

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02 Sep 2016

The Cabinet’s nod to the Surrogacy (Regulation) Bill, 2016 on 24th August 2016[1] is undoubtedly a remarkable initiative to bring more clarity to the grey area of surrogacy regulation in India. However, it has raised many issues and concerns. India, where commercial surrogacy has been legal for more than a decade, has become an attractive worldwide hub for commercial surrogacy, and has led to various issues and unethical practices such as coerced and forced surrogacy, exploitation of surrogate mothers, abandonment of surrogate babies, importing human embryos and gametes etc. This situation created a pressing need for better regulation of surrogacy in India.>>

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04 Nov 2015

On 23rd October 2015, the President of India promulgated a new ordinance called “The Commercial Courts, Commercial Division and Commercial Appellate Division of High Courts Ordinance 2015”. This is an important Ordinance in the larger context of making it easy to do business in India, as it seeks to create a separate set of courts and appellate mechanism to address “commercial disputes”, which the ordinance defines as those disputes arising out of:>>

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17 Jul 2015

Although India is an attractive market and investment destination, it is also true that foreign investors are daunted by the inordinate delays that occur in our legal system. The number of courts, judges and overall infrastructure is grossly inadequate relative to the volume of cases the system is called upon to adjudicate. It is estimated that more than 35 million cases are currently pending before various Indian courts. With this kind of pendency, it is not surprising that disposal of cases often takes several years (and even decades). The situation in countries such as Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Bangladesh, Pakistan etc. is not very different. Especially in commercial matters that often involve large sums of money and/or reputation, delays in obtaining verdicts have significant consequences for the parties involved.>>

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