16 Oct 2020

With constant technological innovation and dynamic transformation of related laws happening worldwide, the jurisprudence regarding reliance on evidence in electronic form is also evolving. Judges these days have demonstrated considerable perceptiveness towards the intrinsic ‘electronic’ nature of evidence, which includes insight regarding the admissibility of such evidence, and the interpretation of the law in relation to the manner in which electronic evidence can be brought and filed before the court.>>

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13 Oct 2020

The pendency of litigation and piling up of cases in courts was the necessity which led to the discovery of alternative dispute resolution mechanisms. These tools of dispute resolution are highly efficient, time-bound and cost-effective. Further, as the dispute resolution is amicable, the delicate and long-standing relationship of parties is preserved. It is for this reason separate tribunals are set up for arbitration, independent mediators can be appointed for mediation and a number of unaided negotiations take place between the parties for settlement of any disputes. Arbitration is also familiar as a form of private litigation as to some extent the formalized means of dispute resolution; witness examination, expert opinions and binding nature of the arbitral award well substantiate the fact. However, with enhanced remedial and appellate participation from the judiciary, the idea of ‘alternative’ dispute resolution seems to replicate a façade. The primeval legislation, Arbitration Act of 1940 provided for a triangular remedial set up, namely rectification, remission and setting aside of the arbitral award. This was narrowed down to remission and setting aside of the award in the subsequent Act, 1996.>>

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17 Nov 2015

For many years, arbitration has been a commonly followed process to settle disputes in India, although with time, different custodians have been vested responsibility for dispute resolution.  For centuries, the heads of families helped amicably resolve issues even though many of them lacked formal legal training or indeed, any experience at all. Later, councils of “village elders” (Panchayats) were formed to facilitate resolution of disputes. The authority and powers vested in them made their decisions more binding.>>

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